MEDIEVAL CARTOONIST

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My name's James. Occasionally, I have been known to draw. I like Medieval history and comic books. I am housebroken and only eat slippers on rare occasions.

Medieval hoard found at French site

archaeologicalnews:

While conducting an excavation near Brest in northwestern France, before the construction of a road, a number of finds were uncovered including a rare early 14th century hoard that speaks of the turbulent times of the Hundred Years Wars.

The archaeologists from INRAP (the French…

historical-nonfiction:

Being pregnant was in fashion during 1400s. Women’s dresses were folded in front, like the one above, to give the illusion of pregnancy. There are even stories of girls using to pillows under their clothing only to create an illusion of baby bumps, 

historical-nonfiction:

Being pregnant was in fashion during 1400s. Women’s dresses were folded in front, like the one above, to give the illusion of pregnancy. There are even stories of girls using to pillows under their clothing only to create an illusion of baby bumps, 

(via medieval-women)

archaicwonder:

Mortuary Temple of Ramesses III, Luxor, Egypt
Also known as Medinet Habu, the Mortuary Temple of Ramesses III (r. 1186–1155 BC), is an important New Kingdom structure on the West Bank of Luxor in Egypt. The temple is probably best known as the source of inscribed reliefs depicting the advent and defeat of the Sea Peoples during the reign of Ramesses III.The temple, some 150 m long, is of orthodox design, and resembles closely the nearby Mortuary Temple of Ramesses II (the Ramesseum). Its walls are relatively well preserved and it is surrounded by a massive mudbrick enclosure, which may have been fortified.

archaicwonder:

Mortuary Temple of Ramesses III, Luxor, Egypt

Also known as Medinet Habu, the Mortuary Temple of Ramesses III (r. 1186–1155 BC), is an important New Kingdom structure on the West Bank of Luxor in Egypt. The temple is probably best known as the source of inscribed reliefs depicting the advent and defeat of the Sea Peoples during the reign of Ramesses III.

The temple, some 150 m long, is of orthodox design, and resembles closely the nearby Mortuary Temple of Ramesses II (the Ramesseum). Its walls are relatively well preserved and it is surrounded by a massive mudbrick enclosure, which may have been fortified.

(Source: clivetemple.blogspot.com)

inacom:

'Bear and a beehive' from Flowers of Virtue and of Custom, Italy, 15th century.

inacom:

'Bear and a beehive' from Flowers of Virtue and of Custom, Italy, 15th century.

(via medieval)

fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Les liaisons dangereuses/ Dangerous Liaisons' by Choderlos de Laclos, illustrated by George Barbier. Published 1934 by Le Vasseur et Cie, Paris.

Description:  A French epistolary novel about the Marquise de Merteuil and the Vicomte de Valmont, two rivals (and ex-lovers) who use seduction as a weapon to humiliate and degrade others, while enjoying their cruel games and boasting about their manipulative talents.

Source

These pictures make the novel seem more exciting than it really is.

ζῷον δίπουν ἄπτερον

"Featherless biped"

- Plato’s famous definition of a human. In response, Diogenese of Sinope brought a plucked chicken to Plato’s Academy, saying:

οὗτός ἐστιν ὁ Πλάτωνος ἄνθρωπος
"Here is the Platonic man!"

(via ancientpeoples)

Greek sass.

(via hodie-scolastica)