MEDIEVAL CARTOONIST

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My name's James. Occasionally, I have been known to draw. I like Medieval history and comic books. I am housebroken and only eat slippers on rare occasions.
medievalistsnet:








Least of the laity: the minimum requirements for a medieval Christian 



This article investigates the minimum level of religious observance expected of lay Christians by church authorities, and the degree to which legislation and procedures attempted to enforce these stan- dards.1 Once baptized, a person entered the community of the faithful; and the medieval church was as much accountable for the health and salvation of the ignorant, the ambivalent, the disobedient or distracted as they were of the devout. From the twelfth century, theologians, clerical authorities and the laity turned with concerted enthusiasm to the question of lay observance, advancing high ideals for lay commitment and expanding opportunities for lay participation. Yet while acting to elucidate and advance these quali- ties, the church was nevertheless mindful of the number of Christians who might fail to reach even basic standards. The resulting balance of the ideal and the possible, and the degree to which it reached and was enforced upon the less-enthusiastic laity is explored here through expectations for knowledge, observance of sacraments, and participation in regular duties such as church attendance, tithe-paying and fasting. The result was a complex ideal of lay observance that was balanced by a tolerance of laxity and even failure, and a system which increasingly exhorted specific expectations but was hesitant to define contumacy or disobedience in many but the most obdurate or scandalous cases.



 

medievalistsnet:

Least of the laity: the minimum requirements for a medieval Christian 

This article investigates the minimum level of religious observance expected of lay Christians by church authorities, and the degree to which legislation and procedures attempted to enforce these stan- dards.Once baptized, a person entered the community of the faithful; and the medieval church was as much accountable for the health and salvation of the ignorant, the ambivalent, the disobedient or distracted as they were of the devout. From the twelfth century, theologians, clerical authorities and the laity turned with concerted enthusiasm to the question of lay observance, advancing high ideals for lay commitment and expanding opportunities for lay participation. Yet while acting to elucidate and advance these quali- ties, the church was nevertheless mindful of the number of Christians who might fail to reach even basic standards. The resulting balance of the ideal and the possible, and the degree to which it reached and was enforced upon the less-enthusiastic laity is explored here through expectations for knowledge, observance of sacraments, and participation in regular duties such as church attendance, tithe-paying and fasting. The result was a complex ideal of lay observance that was balanced by a tolerance of laxity and even failure, and a system which increasingly exhorted specific expectations but was hesitant to define contumacy or disobedience in many but the most obdurate or scandalous cases.

 

(via hodie-scolastica)

mediumaevum:

Medieval Dances - The Egg Dance
The Egg dance was one of the earliest Saxon Medieval dances and, like the Carole, was performed during a period of festivity namely the Easter-tide festivities. The  egg dance was derived from a traditional Easter game, in the egg dance eggs were laid on the ground or floor and the goal was to dance among them damaging as few eggs as possible.
image: The Egg Dance by  Pieter Brueghel the Younger

mediumaevum:

Medieval Dances - The Egg Dance

The Egg dance was one of the earliest Saxon Medieval dances and, like the Carole, was performed during a period of festivity namely the Easter-tide festivities. The  egg dance was derived from a traditional Easter game, in the egg dance eggs were laid on the ground or floor and the goal was to dance among them damaging as few eggs as possible.

imageThe Egg Dance by  Pieter Brueghel the Younger

kryptoncat:

quoms:

cupiscent:

petermorwood:

ancientpanoply:

A video made for the Museum of Cluny, and its “The Sword: Uses, Myths and Symbols” exhibit. It tries to dispel some of the beliefs that are still prevalent today about the weight and mobility of fighters in plate armor and show some of the techniques used in combat against armored opponents

I’m always pleased to see videos like this. It’s as if people won’t believe unless they’re shown (and there are always some who go “ah, yes, well, in aluminium stage armour it’s easy.”)

Well, the Museum Cluny video, like the Royal Armoury demo team, uses real steel armour: those two pictures at the start show the originals; the video uses reproductions because no curator will let someone take two exhibits from his museum and roll them around on flagstones. Mike Loades in the UK has been doing similar armour demonstrations for years, as has Tobias Capwell of the Wallace Collection. Eventually the old “clunky, immobile, in with a wrench, out with a can-opener” image of plate armour will go away – but I won’t hold my breath. (That shade of purple isn’t a good complexion anyway…)

Even the faster demonstrations of these combat techniques are still dialled back to about half speed. Try to visualise how much quicker and more brutal this would be if the two fighters meant business, when the first rule was Do It To Him As Quickly As Possible Before He Does It To You.

Writer and swordsman Guy Windsor writes about doing motion-capture work for a computer game; his completely authentic techniques couldn’t be used because they were so small, fast and economical. The game needed big swashing movements because the real thing looked unrealistic, too insignificant to be effective…

You won’t see a “killing fight” (full speed, full power, full intent) recreated very often, either on documentaries or in museum exhibitions, because it’s very, very dangerous for (when you think about it) obvious reasons. These techniques from 600-year-old fight manuals were how men in armour maimed and killed other men in armour - and since they’re the original material, not a re-interpretation after 600 years of being diluted down to sport-safe levels, the techniques will still maim and kill men in armour. Even a blunt “safe” sword is pointed enough (first demo on the video, 1:54-59) to go into a helmet’s eye-slot and through the skull inside…

But if you’re lucky enough to see a full-speed demo between fighters in real armour using wasters (wooden practice swords), be prepared to pick your jaw up from the floor. It is awesome. And also as scary as hell.

Comments on comments:

"Pretty much proof positive that the people who claim that skimpy female fantasy armor is for increased maneuverability don’t know what they’re talking about."

They know exactly what they’re talking about. They want to see T&A on fantasy game and book covers, and since they don’t have the balls to be honest about it, this is their excuse.

It amazes me that the old saws about Western armour and techniques are still going about, because surely two minutes’ thought would let you know that of course knights had to be able to get up off the ground…  Europeans were wearing armour for centuries, why wouldn’t they develop techniques of fighting in it?

It’s easier to laugh (do the same people laugh about samurai?) and repeat what “everyone knows about armour" than it is to waste that two minutes thought. Thinking might reveal something to mess with set opinions, and that would be annoying…

Biggest pet peeve: People commenting on the weight and shape of armour restricting mobility…

As before - “everybody knows" that European armour is massive and clunky because that’s what "everybody knows.” God forbid they should ever apply the “if it was so useless then why was it used" logic to anything. Because then they might realise that what "everybody knows" is wrong.

I’m going off to (not) hold my breath for a while… :-P

I saw this video in the fascinating special exhibit at Cluny last time we were in Paris. So pleased to be able to have it on tap, because it was most excellent.

image

(via fuckyeaharthuriana)

Anna Komnene

hodie-scolastica:

No pictures of Anna herself seem to exist, so have some images of her parents, Alexios I Komnenos and Eirene (Irene) Doukaina instead. Also, is it just me or does Alexios look really grumpy?
[Alexios I, 11th century, Image Source]
[Coin with the image of Christ on one side and Eirene…

medieval-women:

Woodcuts from a German treatise on witches, ‘De laniis et phitonicis mulieribus’, by Ulrich Molitor, 1489.

1st image: the devil’s seduction

2nd image: the witch’s kitchen

3rd image: a magical meal

www.ubs.sbg.ac.at/sosa/inkunabeln/WI167.htm

I think I saw the magical meal at Starbucks this morning.

mediumaevum:

The Vatican’s Precious Manuscripts Go Online
Almost 600 years after Pope Nicholas V founded the Vatican Apostolic Library, the Holy See is now turning to 50 experts, five scanners and a Japanese IT firm to digitize millions of pages from its priceless manuscripts, opening them to the broader public for the first time.
Read more on WSJ
image (x)

mediumaevum:

The Vatican’s Precious Manuscripts Go Online

Almost 600 years after Pope Nicholas V founded the Vatican Apostolic Library, the Holy See is now turning to 50 experts, five scanners and a Japanese IT firm to digitize millions of pages from its priceless manuscripts, opening them to the broader public for the first time.

Read more on WSJ

image (x)

mediumaevum:

On the first day of April historian community lost Jacques Le Goff. He died in Paris, aged 90.

Over a long and influential career in academia and public broadcasting, Le Goff transformed views of the middle ages from a dark and backward time to a period that laid the foundations for modern western civilisation.
He was a leading proponent of “new history” – the shift in historical research from emphasis on political figures and events to mentality and anthropology.

Read on

I am sad that I didn’t hear about this….I love Jacques Le Goff.

mediumaevum:

On the first day of April historian community lost Jacques Le Goff. He died in Paris, aged 90.

Over a long and influential career in academia and public broadcasting, Le Goff transformed views of the middle ages from a dark and backward time to a period that laid the foundations for modern western civilisation.

He was a leading proponent of “new history” – the shift in historical research from emphasis on political figures and events to mentality and anthropology.

Read on

I am sad that I didn’t hear about this….I love Jacques Le Goff.

raychleadele:

mymodernmet:

Professional sculptor Stefanie Rocknak beat out 265 other artists from 42 states and 13 countries to create a sculpture honoring author and poet Edgar Allan Poe that will be displayed in Boston, Poe’s birthplace. A five-member artist selection committee decided on Rocknak’s stunning work that shows Poe with a suitcase in hand and a raven in front of him.

No wonder she won, holy butts, look at that majestic creature.

My towns getting a new statue. Scouted the place myself last night.

(via wilwheaton)