MEDIEVAL CARTOONIST

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My name's James. Occasionally, I have been known to draw. I like Medieval history and comic books. I am housebroken and only eat slippers on rare occasions.

Anna Komnene

hodie-scolastica:

No pictures of Anna herself seem to exist, so have some images of her parents, Alexios I Komnenos and Eirene (Irene) Doukaina instead. Also, is it just me or does Alexios look really grumpy?
[Alexios I, 11th century, Image Source]
[Coin with the image of Christ on one side and Eirene…

medieval-women:

Woodcuts from a German treatise on witches, ‘De laniis et phitonicis mulieribus’, by Ulrich Molitor, 1489.

1st image: the devil’s seduction

2nd image: the witch’s kitchen

3rd image: a magical meal

www.ubs.sbg.ac.at/sosa/inkunabeln/WI167.htm

I think I saw the magical meal at Starbucks this morning.

mediumaevum:

The Vatican’s Precious Manuscripts Go Online
Almost 600 years after Pope Nicholas V founded the Vatican Apostolic Library, the Holy See is now turning to 50 experts, five scanners and a Japanese IT firm to digitize millions of pages from its priceless manuscripts, opening them to the broader public for the first time.
Read more on WSJ
image (x)

mediumaevum:

The Vatican’s Precious Manuscripts Go Online

Almost 600 years after Pope Nicholas V founded the Vatican Apostolic Library, the Holy See is now turning to 50 experts, five scanners and a Japanese IT firm to digitize millions of pages from its priceless manuscripts, opening them to the broader public for the first time.

Read more on WSJ

image (x)

mediumaevum:

On the first day of April historian community lost Jacques Le Goff. He died in Paris, aged 90.

Over a long and influential career in academia and public broadcasting, Le Goff transformed views of the middle ages from a dark and backward time to a period that laid the foundations for modern western civilisation.
He was a leading proponent of “new history” – the shift in historical research from emphasis on political figures and events to mentality and anthropology.

Read on

I am sad that I didn’t hear about this….I love Jacques Le Goff.

mediumaevum:

On the first day of April historian community lost Jacques Le Goff. He died in Paris, aged 90.

Over a long and influential career in academia and public broadcasting, Le Goff transformed views of the middle ages from a dark and backward time to a period that laid the foundations for modern western civilisation.

He was a leading proponent of “new history” – the shift in historical research from emphasis on political figures and events to mentality and anthropology.

Read on

I am sad that I didn’t hear about this….I love Jacques Le Goff.

raychleadele:

mymodernmet:

Professional sculptor Stefanie Rocknak beat out 265 other artists from 42 states and 13 countries to create a sculpture honoring author and poet Edgar Allan Poe that will be displayed in Boston, Poe’s birthplace. A five-member artist selection committee decided on Rocknak’s stunning work that shows Poe with a suitcase in hand and a raven in front of him.

No wonder she won, holy butts, look at that majestic creature.

My towns getting a new statue. Scouted the place myself last night.

(via wilwheaton)

tragedyseries:

Please visit me at Emerald City Comiccon, table 1214, this weekend! I will have had crumpets & am thus likely to be in good spirits.

I love this guy’s work.

tragedyseries:

Please visit me at Emerald City Comiccon, table 1214, this weekend! I will have had crumpets & am thus likely to be in good spirits.

I love this guy’s work.

mediumaevum:

Eilmer of Malmesbury was an 11th-century English Benedictine monk best known for his early attempt at a gliding flight using wings.
He is known to have written on astrology. All that is known of him is written by the eminent medieval historian William of Malmesbury in about 1125. In his words:

He was a man learned for those times, of ripe old age, and in his early youth had hazarded a deed of remarkable boldness. He had by some means, I scarcely know what, fastened wings to his hands and feet so that, mistaking fable for truth, he might fly like Daedalus, and, collecting the breeze upon the summit of a tower, flew for more than a furlong [201 metres]. But agitated by the violence of the wind and the swirling of air, as well as by the awareness of his rash attempt, he fell, broke both his legs and was lame ever after. He used to relate as the cause of his failure, his forgetting to provide himself a tail.

Eilmer typified the inquisitive spirit of medieval enthusiasts who developed small drawstring toy helicopters, windmills, and sophisticated sails for boats. Church artists increasingly showed angels with ever more accurate depictions of bird-like wings. This led to a general acceptance that air was something that could be “worked.” Flying was thus not magical, but could be attained by physical effort and human reasoning.
image: (x) Detail from Edwardian Stained glass in Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire. This image is the work of Bell & Co of Bristol. It dates from 1921.

mediumaevum:

Eilmer of Malmesbury was an 11th-century English Benedictine monk best known for his early attempt at a gliding flight using wings.

He is known to have written on astrology. All that is known of him is written by the eminent medieval historian William of Malmesbury in about 1125. In his words:

He was a man learned for those times, of ripe old age, and in his early youth had hazarded a deed of remarkable boldness. He had by some means, I scarcely know what, fastened wings to his hands and feet so that, mistaking fable for truth, he might fly like Daedalus, and, collecting the breeze upon the summit of a tower, flew for more than a furlong [201 metres]. But agitated by the violence of the wind and the swirling of air, as well as by the awareness of his rash attempt, he fell, broke both his legs and was lame ever after. He used to relate as the cause of his failure, his forgetting to provide himself a tail.

Eilmer typified the inquisitive spirit of medieval enthusiasts who developed small drawstring toy helicopters, windmills, and sophisticated sails for boats. Church artists increasingly showed angels with ever more accurate depictions of bird-like wings. This led to a general acceptance that air was something that could be “worked.” Flying was thus not magical, but could be attained by physical effort and human reasoning.

image: (x) Detail from Edwardian Stained glass in Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire. This image is the work of Bell & Co of Bristol. It dates from 1921.

(Source: Wikipedia)