MEDIEVAL CARTOONIST

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My name's James. Occasionally, I have been known to draw. I like Medieval history and comic books. I am housebroken and only eat slippers on rare occasions.
Pas d’armes - or passage of arms. Was a later chivalric martial game where a (presumably) bored knight would stake out a place of frequent travel (bridge, etc). Any knights that came to pass through would be challenged to fisticuffs. If they refused, the challenged party were to leave their spurs in humiliation for their cowardliness.
Whereas, un-escorted ladies would have to leave a favor of some kind, to be potentially rescued by another knight who passed through later.
The Leonese Suero de Quiñones (+1456) was called Él del Passo, because he held a bridge over the river Órbigo for over a month.
It reminds me of the guys who used to duel spam people on the bridge in Stormwind.

Pas d’armesor passage of arms. Was a later chivalric martial game where a (presumably) bored knight would stake out a place of frequent travel (bridge, etc). Any knights that came to pass through would be challenged to fisticuffs. If they refused, the challenged party were to leave their spurs in humiliation for their cowardliness.

Whereas, un-escorted ladies would have to leave a favor of some kind, to be potentially rescued by another knight who passed through later.

The Leonese Suero de Quiñones (+1456) was called Él del Passo, because he held a bridge over the river Órbigo for over a month.

It reminds me of the guys who used to duel spam people on the bridge in Stormwind.

jdweiss:

OSS 117: Lost in Rio

I love these movies.

jdweiss:

OSS 117: Lost in Rio

I love these movies.

medievalistsnet:

Clemency, chivalry and ransom during the early and high Middle Ages…
Killing or Clemency? Ransom, Chivalry and Changing Attitudes to Defeated Opponents in Britain and Northern France, 7-12th centuries
Matthew J. Strickland
Krieg im Mittelalter (2001)
On 25 September, 1066, the forces of King Harold II of England fell upon the unsuspecting Norwegian army of Harald Hadraada at Stamford Bridge in Yorkshire. In the fierce battle which ensued, the English lost many of their best warriors, but both Hardraada and his ally Tosti Godwineson, Harold’s own brother, were slain and the Norwegians virtually annihilated. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, the English king gave quarter to the Norwegian reserve force under Olaf, Hardraada’s son, and the earl of Orkney, who had not been present at the main battle, but of 300 ships which had sailed into the Humber earlier that month, only 24 were needed to carry away the survivors.[1] We hear of no prisoners, no ransom…

medievalistsnet:

Clemency, chivalry and ransom during the early and high Middle Ages…

Killing or Clemency? Ransom, Chivalry and Changing Attitudes to Defeated Opponents in Britain and Northern France, 7-12th centuries

Matthew J. Strickland

Krieg im Mittelalter (2001)

On 25 September, 1066, the forces of King Harold II of England fell upon the unsuspecting Norwegian army of Harald Hadraada at Stamford Bridge in Yorkshire. In the fierce battle which ensued, the English lost many of their best warriors, but both Hardraada and his ally Tosti Godwineson, Harold’s own brother, were slain and the Norwegians virtually annihilated. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, the English king gave quarter to the Norwegian reserve force under Olaf, Hardraada’s son, and the earl of Orkney, who had not been present at the main battle, but of 300 ships which had sailed into the Humber earlier that month, only 24 were needed to carry away the survivors.[1] We hear of no prisoners, no ransom…

tiny-librarian:

A Pennsylvania museum has solved the mystery of a Renaissance portrait in an investigation that spans hundreds of years, layers of paint and the murdered daughter of an Italian duke.

Among the works featured in the Carnegie Museum’s exhibit Faked, Forgotten, Found is a portrait of Isabella de’Medici, the spirited favorite daughter of Cosimo de’Medici, the first Grand Duke of Florence, whose face hadn’t seen the light of day in almost 200 years.

Isabella Medici’s strong nose, steely stare and high forehead plucked of hair, as was the fashion in 1570, was hidden beneath layers of paint applied by a Victorian artist to render the work more saleable to a 19th century buyer.

The result was a pretty, bland face with rosy cheeks and gently smiling lips that Louise Lippincott, curator of fine arts at the museum, thought was a possible fake.

Before deciding to deaccession the work, Lippincott brought the painting, which was purportedly of Eleanor of Toledo, a famed beauty and the mother of Isabella de’Medici, to the Pittsburgh museum’s conservator Ellen Baxter to confirm her suspicions.

Baxter was immediately intrigued. The woman’s clothing was spot-on, with its high lace collar and richly patterned bodice, but her face was all wrong, ‘like a Victorian cookie tin box lid,’ Baxter told Carnegie Magazine.

After finding the stamp of Francis Needham on the back of the work, Baxter did some research and found that Needham worked in National Portrait Gallery in London in the mid-1800s transferring paintings from wood panels to canvas mounts.

Paintings on canvas usually have large cracks, but the ones on the Eleanor of Toledo portrait were much smaller than would be expected.

Baxter devised a theory that the work had been transferred from a wood panel onto canvas and then repainted so that the woman’s face was more pleasing to the Victorian art-buyer, some 300 years after it had been painted.

Source/Read More

art-of-swords:

European Sword

  • Dated: circa 1400
  • Culture: Western European
  • Medium: steel, silver, copper alloy, leather
  • Measurements: L. 40 1/4 in. (102.24 cm); L. of blade, 32 in. (81.28 cm); Wt. 3 lb. 11 oz. (1673 g)

The silver-embellished pommel and the crossguard made of copper alloy (rather than steel) wrapped with silver wire suggest that this sword was intended for presentation or for ceremonial use rather than as a fighting weapon. The Latin quotation inscribed on the pommel reads in translation, “here, too, virture has its due reward” (Virgil, Aeneid, book 1, line 461).

The inscription (now illegible) on the blade is an early example of the use of etching for the decoration of a weapon. Approximately a century later, acid etching became a popular way to embellish arms and armor and an important technique in printmaking.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

medievalistsnet:

The healing hand: the role of women in Graeco-Roman medicine
FP Retief and L Cilliers
Acta Theologica: Supplementum 7 (2005)
Abstract
In contrast with the struggle of 19th and 20th century women all over the world to be admitted to medical schools, women in ancient Greece and Rome were apparently increasingly at liberty to practise medicine from the 4th century BC onwards. The available evidence offers conclusive proof of this more tolerant attitude. The sources are few in number, but fragmentary information can be gleaned from medical writers, passing remarks in Greek and Latin authors, and funerary inscriptions. These sources emphasise the professions of midwife and female doctor. Although there is some overlap between their duties, we find that in Greece a distinction was drawn between maia and iatrikê as early as the 4th century BC, while in Rome the two professions of obstetrix and medica or iatrina were well established by the 1st century BC…

medievalistsnet:

The healing hand: the role of women in Graeco-Roman medicine

FP Retief and L Cilliers

Acta Theologica: Supplementum 7 (2005)

Abstract

In contrast with the struggle of 19th and 20th century women all over the world to be admitted to medical schools, women in ancient Greece and Rome were apparently increasingly at liberty to practise medicine from the 4th century BC onwards. The available evidence offers conclusive proof of this more tolerant attitude. The sources are few in number, but fragmentary information can be gleaned from medical writers, passing remarks in Greek and Latin authors, and funerary inscriptions. These sources emphasise the professions of midwife and female doctor. Although there is some overlap between their duties, we find that in Greece a distinction was drawn between maia and iatrikê as early as the 4th century BC, while in Rome the two professions of obstetrix and medica or iatrina were well established by the 1st century BC…

(via hodie-scolastica)

The nightmare of the artist:

The realization that what you drew in two minutes on a cocktail napkin is better than any finished piece you’ve done in months.