MEDIEVAL CARTOONIST

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My name's James. Occasionally, I have been known to draw. I like Medieval history and comic books. I am housebroken and only eat slippers on rare occasions.

mediumaevum:

Are these your ancestors?

Faces of medieval Scots digitally reconstructed after their skulls were unearthed in a cemetery (read on)

art-of-swords:

Rapier Sword

  • Dated: circa 1600
  • Culture: Spanish
  • Measurements: overall length 104 cm

The sword has a double-edged blade of diamond section, with the smith’s mark on the ricasso. It features an iron swept hilt comprising a globular gadrooned pommel and grip with wire binding.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Antikvity Praha S.R.O.

I’m such a nerd. I saw a woman with gold bees on her shoes and I instinctively sneered at her for being a Bonapartist. Y’know instead of them being just shoes with cute bees on them…

art-of-swords:

Ceremonial Dagger

  • Dated: mid-19th Century
  • Culture: Italian

The dagger has a straight, double-edged blade, ribbed at the tip and with three deep grooves. The tang is slightly thickened, and almost the entire surface is engraved with floral motifs. It features a brass hilt picturing a skeleton wearing a tunic, while the guard features is a snake in-the-round. Comes together with a velvet-covered wooden sheath with brass mounts decorated with bas-relieved leaf patterns.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Live Auctioneers

Pas d’armes - or passage of arms. Was a later chivalric martial game where a (presumably) bored knight would stake out a place of frequent travel (bridge, etc). Any knights that came to pass through would be challenged to fisticuffs. If they refused, the challenged party were to leave their spurs in humiliation for their cowardliness.
Whereas, un-escorted ladies would have to leave a favor of some kind, to be potentially rescued by another knight who passed through later.
The Leonese Suero de Quiñones (+1456) was called Él del Passo, because he held a bridge over the river Órbigo for over a month.
It reminds me of the guys who used to duel spam people on the bridge in Stormwind.

Pas d’armesor passage of arms. Was a later chivalric martial game where a (presumably) bored knight would stake out a place of frequent travel (bridge, etc). Any knights that came to pass through would be challenged to fisticuffs. If they refused, the challenged party were to leave their spurs in humiliation for their cowardliness.

Whereas, un-escorted ladies would have to leave a favor of some kind, to be potentially rescued by another knight who passed through later.

The Leonese Suero de Quiñones (+1456) was called Él del Passo, because he held a bridge over the river Órbigo for over a month.

It reminds me of the guys who used to duel spam people on the bridge in Stormwind.

jdweiss:

OSS 117: Lost in Rio

I love these movies.

jdweiss:

OSS 117: Lost in Rio

I love these movies.

medievalistsnet:

Clemency, chivalry and ransom during the early and high Middle Ages…
Killing or Clemency? Ransom, Chivalry and Changing Attitudes to Defeated Opponents in Britain and Northern France, 7-12th centuries
Matthew J. Strickland
Krieg im Mittelalter (2001)
On 25 September, 1066, the forces of King Harold II of England fell upon the unsuspecting Norwegian army of Harald Hadraada at Stamford Bridge in Yorkshire. In the fierce battle which ensued, the English lost many of their best warriors, but both Hardraada and his ally Tosti Godwineson, Harold’s own brother, were slain and the Norwegians virtually annihilated. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, the English king gave quarter to the Norwegian reserve force under Olaf, Hardraada’s son, and the earl of Orkney, who had not been present at the main battle, but of 300 ships which had sailed into the Humber earlier that month, only 24 were needed to carry away the survivors.[1] We hear of no prisoners, no ransom…

medievalistsnet:

Clemency, chivalry and ransom during the early and high Middle Ages…

Killing or Clemency? Ransom, Chivalry and Changing Attitudes to Defeated Opponents in Britain and Northern France, 7-12th centuries

Matthew J. Strickland

Krieg im Mittelalter (2001)

On 25 September, 1066, the forces of King Harold II of England fell upon the unsuspecting Norwegian army of Harald Hadraada at Stamford Bridge in Yorkshire. In the fierce battle which ensued, the English lost many of their best warriors, but both Hardraada and his ally Tosti Godwineson, Harold’s own brother, were slain and the Norwegians virtually annihilated. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, the English king gave quarter to the Norwegian reserve force under Olaf, Hardraada’s son, and the earl of Orkney, who had not been present at the main battle, but of 300 ships which had sailed into the Humber earlier that month, only 24 were needed to carry away the survivors.[1] We hear of no prisoners, no ransom…