MEDIEVAL CARTOONIST

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My name's James. Occasionally, I have been known to draw. I like Medieval history and comic books. I am housebroken and only eat slippers on rare occasions.

erikkwakkel:

The splendor of Strahov Library

I am typing this while looking at the building where these images were taken: the library of Strahov Abbey, towering high above Prague. While the monastery was established in 1143, the library dates from 1720. It is one of the most impressive I have visited: thousands of books placed in what looks more like a museum than a library. I hope you get a sense of the atmosphere from these images.

Pics (my own): Strahov Abbey Library, Prague.

Arr! Merry International Talk Like a Pirate Day, Me Hardies!

Emperor's frescoed rooms unveiled for first time in Rome

archaeologicalnews:

ROME: Lavishly frescoed rooms in the houses of the Roman Emperor Augustus and his wife Livia are opening for the first time to the public on Thursday (Sep 18), after years of painstaking restoration. The houses on Rome’s Palatine hill where the emperor lived with his family are re-opening…

It’s been over ten year since I went to Rome. It’s about time I headed back.

The ubiquitous forms of address for women ‘Mrs’ and ‘Miss’ are both abbreviations of ‘mistress’. Although mistress is a term with a multiplicity of meanings, in early modern England the mistress most commonly designated the female equivalent of master–that is, a person with capital who directed servants or apprentices.

Prior to the mid eighteenth century, there was only Mrs (or Mris, Ms, or other forms of abbreviation). Mrs was applied to any adult woman who merited the social distinction, without any marital connotation. Miss was reserved for young girls until the mid eighteenth century. Even when adult single women started to use Miss, Mrs still designated a social or business standing, and not the status of being married, until at least the mid nineteenth century.

This article demonstrates the changes in nomenclature over time, explains why Mrs was never used to accord older single women the same status as a married woman, and argues that the distinctions are important to economic and social historians.

Abstract from Mistresses and Marriage: or, a Short History of the Mrs, also known as the most interesting article I’ve read all day.

Full text is available here, but if you remember one thing, how about that Jane Austen in 1811 is the earliest citation that the author can find for the “Mrs Man” form, e.g. “Mrs John Dashwood”? 

(via allthingslinguistic)

(via mirousworlds)

King Richard III's Final Moments Were Quick & Brutal

archaeologicalnews:

Richard III’s last moments were likely quick but terrifying, according to a new study of the death wounds of the last king of England to die in battle.

The last king of the Plantagenet dynasty faced his death at the Battle of Bosworth Field on Aug. 22, 1485, only two years after ascending the…

Dante obsessed over a woman named Beatrice; for real, not just in the Divine Comedy. Her name was Beatrice Portinari.

He practically stalked the woman for 9 years before she talked to the man. During which time Dante was betrothed to Gemma Donati. But, he continued to write sonnets, watch her in church, and she would be polite in return, probably mildly amused at first.

The same year Dante’s first son was born, 1237, Beatrice married but Dante continued courting her openly. She finally publicly shunned him for not taking a hint and he felt stricken by it. She moved to the other side of the Arno, across Florence, and he would follow her just to have a look at her.

When she fell ill and died in 1290, he wrote a history of their “relationship.”

When Dante and Gemma had a daughter, he named her Beatrice.

Item: he never wrote about his wife and mother to his children, Gemma, at all, not even negatively. Just nothing.

Granted, all this is viewed in a modern context rather than an 11th Century Florentine one…

[Lewis, “Dante: a Life” Penguin: New York, 2001.]

middlemarching:

dan-spiegel:

jekoh:

girlwithalessonplan:

philalexandros:

tranceofreading:

lianabrooks:

britegreenstar:

libraryadvocates:

lalie:

The fact that the ALA shared this link is so gloriously bitter and angry and I love it.

Is there a portmanteau for that? Angritter? Bangry? 

My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.

Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 
While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.
That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 

I couldn’t hit the reblog button fast enough.

So much reblog.

womp womp

Touts…as “Netflix For Books!”…you mean…A LIBRARY?

This makes me sick.
Signal boosting this in the hopes that someone decides to join their local library instead of supporting selfish, money-grubbing companies with no regard for a community. Please join me, this is important for our future.
Imagine if we had no libraries, and this $150 a month was your only choice.
That’s where we’re headed. Support your local library, not greedy corporate monsters.

this.support your local public libraries goddamnit, they exist for you. and if they disappeared, you would definitely notice.

middlemarching:

dan-spiegel:

jekoh:

girlwithalessonplan:

philalexandros:

tranceofreading:

lianabrooks:

britegreenstar:

libraryadvocates:

lalie:

The fact that the ALA shared this link is so gloriously bitter and angry and I love it.

Is there a portmanteau for that? Angritter? Bangry? 

My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.

Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 

While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.

That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 

I couldn’t hit the reblog button fast enough.

So much reblog.

womp womp

Touts…as “Netflix For Books!”

…you mean…A LIBRARY?

This makes me sick.

Signal boosting this in the hopes that someone decides to join their local library instead of supporting selfish, money-grubbing companies with no regard for a community. Please join me, this is important for our future.

Imagine if we had no libraries, and this $150 a month was your only choice.

That’s where we’re headed. Support your local library, not greedy corporate monsters.

this.

support your local public libraries goddamnit, they exist for you. and if they disappeared, you would definitely notice.

(via darksand17)